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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
a conversion of interest or views between the president and john boehner. i'm not sure that i see it yet. the president said you have to go to the clinton area, 36% top marginal rate. and you said a few loopholes that's fine but not the real battle we should be undertaking. am i correct? >> now boehner we're back to where we were before the election in some respects. there is a significant core of the republican party that simply will not raise taxes under any sixths. they will not raise rates. they still feel that they are pledged to grover norquist, maybe not to the american people. not to the constitution, but to grover norquist. therefore they're not going to go along--even if boehner wants them to go along. both sides the president and democrats on one side, boehner and the republicans are basically maneuvering for bargaining position for what is going to be a long-term negotiation. >> eliot: they're just shadow boxing, i think that's exactly right. i wonder and i'm trying to assess--i have no knowledge of what goes on inside the republican party but i'm trying to discern if boehner
or are we more likely to see topless pictures of speaker boehner before we see a willingness to compromise. >> i wish i could get that imagine out of my head. >> i apologize but that's the reality. >> maybe yours. everybody is saying, look, john boehner has talked about the possible of raising revenues, he looks really reasonable now. he hasn't said no. the big question is, we've talked about this since the election, you and i and others, that what's at stake here is whether boehner can actually cut a deal and still remain speaker of the house. that is there isn't a mutiny, there isn't an opening on the right for a rebellion against him. he could not do that last time around in the summer of 2011 when the president tried to reach this grand bargain with him. it was clear to people working with him and in the room, democrats and members of the administration, that he himself would have cut that deal and would have, you know, walked away and held the president's hand and said look what we can do when we're adults in washington. but he was told by members of his own party, if you do that, our
closing loopholes. that is a reputation of what john boehner suggested in the days since the president has been re-elected. >> that's totally right. a key point, the simpson-bowles tax idea is kind of a magic pony, right. everyone agrees in the ab instruct, we can bring down the rates, close loopholes and deductions and raise revenue. if that's such a wonderful idea how come it's only come up now. how come no one has done it. the reason is because it's really, really hard politically. once you get into the specifics. if you're trying to tie all the revenue to this abstract tax reform idea you're going to get into a position where the revenue is about never going to happen because once you get into reality it doesn't materialize. >> you have to do both, john. you have to do -- you have to raise the the rates and close loopholes to get the amount -- >> just raise the rates. >> you can't raise the rates high enough to produce $1.6 trillion. >> you can get $900 billion from expiring the bush tax cuts. >> and where do you get the other $700 billion from from. >> do a little reform and cut the r
a big deal or grand bargain with the republic speaker john boehner. during election year we haven't heard any of that because they were fighting so much. now the president saying how he wants a deal. speaker boehner all recent days been saying all the right things. it's interesting that today the president didn't really move an inch toward the republicans and speaker boehner had some comments that suggested he is not ready to move towards the president. take a listen thrrvettle are ways to put revenue on the table without increasing tax rates. we have talked about this now for over a year. you could -- there is all kinds of information and data out there. but, getting into the specifics of that at this point would not be conducive to trying to come to an agreement with the white house. >> so the bottom line is that neither side has -- president at his news conference today or john boehner in his conference have gotten into the tough specifics about what's going to happen to taxes, what's going to happen in terms of spending cuts to try to get a big debt cut maybe up to $4 trillion
. the president still insisting letting the bush tax cuts expire. meanwhile, house speaker john boehner remaining opposed to raising these tax cuts. do you think because of a lot of attention and oxygen being taken up in washington, d.c. with what's taking place with petraeus and allen there will be a way for like minds to come to a come prose mize. >> you're absolutely right, thomas. the media coverage is on these emerging facts on petraeus and other cases. the answer is, i think so, i hope so. we're not there yet. we have six weeks to work this out. two parts of the fiscal cliff, are across the board cuts. we'll be able to come one an alternative way to reduce the deficit in a smarter way to avoid that. the tax piece is a lot tougher and a lot bigger, the president as you know, we should immediately act, we the congress, to extend tax relief for 98% of the american people. in fact, taxpayers would get tax relief on first 250,000 in income. if we want to address the long-term deficit, it has to do with the cliff. speaker boehner needs to come forward and put that on the table as the president ha
't, toure. some complementary things said from an aide close to speaker boehner saying it was a very productive, positive meeting there with the president at the white house. the most interesting thing, though, from the boehner aide was that john boehner believes there is not enough time from now until the end of the year to actually have a grand bargain. there's enough time, though, to put together the framework for what a grand bargain would look like. essentially have the top lines agreed to that by sometime in 2013 you could have both the chambers, the senate and the house, come together on some substantial tax reform, entitlement reform, and get rid of the sort of automatic cuts that we see as a sequester, and the tax increases and have a mechanism you can replace them with. listen to the congressional leaders in their photo op in the white house before thanksgiving that they had today. >> we've put revenue on the table, as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> we have a cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to have to give up som
they already agreed to that. i think you heard john boehner say that already. we've had votes in the senate where we've actually gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think the vast majority of americans agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem? and the real problem is uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. not just under this administration, under republican administration. >> let me turn to senator schumer on this point. >> so you have to approach both sides of it. >> let me turn to senator schumer. i'm going to ask you the same question. if the mandate is compromised, what do democrats have to be prepared to accept as a painful outcome in order to achieve compromise? >> well, i agree with you, the mandate is compromise. that's why we have a divided house and senate. and i think if the house stands for anything it's cut government spending, as tom coburn said, and i think we're going to have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010, where i
an optimistic note about the way forward, as did speaker boehner after the meeting. >> my hope is that this is going to be the beginning of a fruitful process where we're able to come to an agreement that will reduce our deficit in a balanced way. >> to show our seriousness, we have put revenue on the table as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> nbc's mike viqueira joins us live from the white house. mike, are there any signs, i have to put this to you, that the president may be able to persuade republicans at least to maintain the bush tax cuts on those making less than $250,000 a year? is there any sign that he's going to be able to persuade them on that? >> reporter: well, i think that he would be able to persuade them to extend those tax cuts, but he may not be able to persuade them to decouple them from those making more than $250,000 a year, martin. i don't mean to be flip, but that does remain at the end of the day here after the big root velt room photo-op the main sticking point. it's clear democrats feel they have the upper hand as do democrats h
to tackle the impending fiscal cliff but the president and the speaker of the house john boehner each drawing lines that they say they will not cross. the major hurdles, that threat to send the economy into a tailspin, that's coming up next. >>> plus a nascar race turning into a full-scale brawl. look at this. mayhem breaking out of the everybody going at it. we'll tell you what set it off. after this. ve lately. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. jenna: well come back, everyone. now let's return to the economy. the president and house speaker john boehner are suggesting they are willing to compromise to prevent our economy from going over that so-called fiscal cliff but both sides are digging in their heels whether or not to race tax rates for the wealthy. rich edson of the fox business network watching
the president sat between house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid calling for cooperation and compromise. >> we've got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle-class families, that our economy remains strong, that we're creating jobs, and that's an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country, share. so, our challenge is to make sure that, you know, we are able to cooperate together, work together. >> joining me now for more, congressional reporter for "the washington post" ed o'keefe and national journal correspondent nancy cook. good morning both of you. last time we saw those three together, sort of a kumbayah moment when you have reid and boehner and mcconnell together. did you get a sense, ed, putting revenue on the table meant republicans were open to tax hikes for those makes $250,000 or more? >> no, they're not. they still say they don't want to see that increase. by talking about revenues the idea is you close loopholes, find a way to perhaps limit deductions and create revenue that way. but you know, b
have problems. >>neil: read 'em and leap. taxes will go up. and up a lot. speaker boehner says revenues are on the table but we have news for him, when it comes to hiking the taxes, democrats do plan to run the table reportedly not keen on a republican plan to only close loopholes that curb deductions to raise revenue. and democratic leaders expect that and a rate increase, a move that could conceivably send the top rate closer to 45 percent tan the 40 percent they talking about now. when you throw in added surtaxes to pay for health care, the "wall street journal" reporter says you could be look at 50 percent top rate. or more. here we go. >>reporter: that is true if the live in the state of california or someone like you would works, why know if you live in new york but you work in new york and the tax rates in new york city could go do 50 percent and california as high as 52 percent, we have not seen rates that high since the 1970's. >>neil: leave aside what will happen on health care people forget this is a lot more than just returning to the clinton top rate of 39.6 percent. it is
boehner has balked at that idea. it would take away his party's leverage in fiscal cliff issues. >> there's a lot of issues on the table that need to be resolved. i laid out a reasonable framework where both parties can work together and i'm looking forward to meet at the white house on friday and begin that conversation. >> reporter: boehner and other top republicans have proposed eliminating deductions and loopholes that benefit the wealthy instead of raising their tax rates. >> we're not going to hurt our economy and make job creation more difficult, which is exactly what that plan would do. >> reporter: today the president argued closing loopholes alone won't do enough to cut the deficit. they will have that argument face to face with boehner on friday. >> one of the most frequent criticisms we've heard over the past few years from members on both sides is that you haven't done enough to reach out and build relationships. are there concrete ways that you plan to approach your relationships with congress in the second term? >> look, i think there's no doubt i can always do better and i
-free from anywhere. >> caller: why is he talking to speaker boehner. wasn't he tried to get everybody paid off. >> stephanie: from the tobacco companies. >> caller: from the cigarette companies, i mean for years. i've watched politics for years and i mean it was always like a joke two and three years ago always drunk all the time. >> well, yeah. >> caller: you know, a political joke. i've heard people say that. i just want to make a comment. i was watching david schuster the last show, and i can't--i just want to make a comment because i've watched him for years, too. my friend have sisters in college, and i guess he's really popular in dorms. >> stephanie: he's dreamy. >> caller: in dorm rooms. people have pictures of him in their dorm rooms. >> stephanie: really? i can't wait to tease him about that. >> caller: politics, i'm just a housewife, and i hear stories about college but we're not there. >> stephanie: he's like a political geek liker beat. >> like shawn cassidy of the political world. >> caller: they were talking about religion on the last show, and i just wanted to make a comme
directly at odds with house speaker john boehner. >> could you accept a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? we've seen talk about a possible compromise that could leave rates the same but cap deductions for high-income earners. is that something that's acceptable? >> no. >> not at all no, way? >> no. the preponderance made it very clear in his campaign that there are not enough -- what you just described is a formula and a blueprint for hampering our future. you cannot go forward -- you have to cut some investments. if you cut too many you are hampering growth, you're hampering education, investments for the future. >> and even thousands of miles away it appears president obama is still focused on those negotiations. while touring a royal monastery with secretary of state clinton in thailand the president was overheard mentioning the budget talks to a monk. the president later clarified his comments -- >> he's not any monk. >> no. >> he has some big i vestments in the stock market. >> he later clarified his comments at a news conference. >> yes, we were working on
leadership, go to senate, deal over there and then come to boehner and box him in with a deal and present to it him. >> he also said that boehner may want that, too. boehner still doesn't control his caucus. we don't have to ask what the american people wanted. president obama ran on an explicit program of raising taxes on top earners. and boehner is still talking about the romney plan, mess around with loopholes and take away loopholes from top earners. that was romney's plan and romney lost. the president holds the cards here. the world won't come to an end on january 1st if all the rates expire. it's more of a curve. i think we can afford to go off it. >> we'll see. as we quickly approach it. my thanks to the power panel today. i really appreciate your time today. >>> coming up next, a bipartisan plan to fix the nation's debt. the co-chairs are going to join me, ed rendell and former new hampshire senator judd gregg will join me to talk about this. we want to know what you think. should general petraeus have resigned? tweet me your thoughts about this or find me on facebook. oun] today
he does certainly from the far right of his party. you saw boehner say that the party wants to be led. they want to be led as americans, not republicans. again, i think you have somebody like bill crystal who comes out and says republicans need to be more flexible in terms of talking about tax reform. i think norquist in that clip showed a real misreading of what the election was really about. i prish his use of the word -- >> an odd choice of words. >> poopy head. >> they got a thumping here. this is the first president since ronald reagan to win the popular vote in two consecutive elections. they're trying to deny his legitimacy still. >> not all. >> grover norquist is. >> and speaker boehner has said they're ready to be led. >> thank god for one reasonable person. >> he says he's the most reasonable. >> we'll see what happens in january, though. he has that radical right wing tea party caucus to deal with in the house. i want to see them come to grips with reality. >> great pleasure having you both on. as people continue to suffer in the wake of hurricane sandy, thousands are homel
point -- that speaker boehner showed yesterday in his remarks. he basically said that the president won the election, and he should lead. he basically, he said that he was open to revenues. which is, which many in his own party disagree with. um, so i thought the tone was the right thing. now, you know, you can't expect the speaker to turn on a dime in 24 hours and embrace everything; higher taxes, higher taxes on the wealthy. but i think that privately he's seen the handwriting on the wall, and it makes me very hopeful that we can do something big in the next month and a half. it's a good first step. um, i would say two things, though, in relation to it. when you unpack the speaker's speech, there is a premise that doesn't quite work, and we're going to have to help him move others in the republican party away from it. it's called -- part of his speech he talked about dynamic scoring. this idea that if you cut taxes, you will increase revenues. well, it's about time we debunked that myth. it's a rumpelstiltskin fairy tale, dynamic scoring. if you may remember, rumpelstiltskin was the f
uncertainty despite the president's comments and john boehner's comments. cheryl: we're looking at what we've been seeing over the last couple of months and you are saying kind of be prepared for that. a lot of the guests have come on and said you know, there's problems with earnings, but also you can't ignore that spike to the down side after the election. what did you make of all of that last week? what did you read into that? >> well, i mean, heading into the election, there was a lot of sentiment that the the market, the financial markets would have preferred a republican winner. cheryl: sure. fiscally more responsible if their view. -- in their view. >> correct. there's a few there's a lot of financial regulation presently and more to come. a lot of that at least from professional investors is probably where they were on wednesday. cheryl: they were waiting to see. >> i think that's going to settle off. i don't think you will see 300 point swings. you might see back again -- i'm quoting that period of july and august 2011, you could see 100, 150 on any given day, maybe a little bit ou
a split and one of the interesting ways you can follow it has to do with what -- john boehner versus paul ryan. boehner is pushing for conference shame, republican congresswoman rogers while ryan is pushing tom price who used to run the conservative caucus in the house. if most of the caucus is getting behind them then it's a sign they'll dig in their heels. if they're going with boehner, it's a sign they'll deal. >> i want to bring in a democrat on both the armed services committee and select committee on intelligence and the fiscal cliff if i might. do you think the republicans will come to play? >> i believe that they will. it's my hope that everyone has gotten the message loud and clear that the american people expect us to compromise, democrats and republicans coming together to solve the fiscal cliff issue but in a balanced way and that is certainly what president obama has campaigned on protecting a strong middle class, allowing the tax cuts to expire above $250,000, but we can't be afraid to compromise but we can do that without compromising our principles. >> is part of this deal
of a change. john boehner will be the speaker of the house, you know, unless something unforeseen happens in the next few weeks. he will be, he will keep the reign. the republicans gained, you know, a few seats, but that's not really going to effect his shot. he ran unopposed in ohio for his own race, and the defining conflict of the republican conference in the 112th congress, this sort of conflict between eric cantor, the majority leader, and john boehner, the speaker, is really behind them at least, you know, from everything that we have seen. the -- so that is remarkably stable, the first three positions. john boehner will be, you know, the next speaker, eric cantor will be the majority leader, and kevin mccarthy will be the majority whip. where it starts to get interesting is for the conference chairman position. this is currently held by jeb hensarling who is making a bid to be the financial services chairman. hensarling has been a sort of rising star for a while within republican ranks. he was a republican study committee chairman which is sort of the top conservative position in r
's debt crisis. but speaker john boehner told house republicans that after last week's election the mandate from the american people is to work together even if it means additional revenues through tax reform. meanwhile bill kristol, editor of "the weekly standard," seemed to cave in on the president's demand that wealthy people pay more. >> you know what? it won't kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires. it really won't, i don't think. really? t >> reporter: the president begins making his case this week. what's different this time is that administration officials are already suggesting to congress that mr. obama is willing to let the deadline pass, let tax rates go up, and spending be cut if he can't get the deal he wants. norah, charlie? >> wow. bill plante in washington, thank you. >>> later this morning we'll ask conservative activist grover norquist if republicans are backing away from his no tax increase pledge. >>> two weeks ago today superstorm sandy battered the northeast. more than 100,000 homes and businesses still have no power. most of them
would be willing to accept and double the amount that speaker boehner had offered the president during their debt negotiations last year. today the president is scheduled to meet with ceos from a dozen companies. there's some of them on your screen. general electric, ford, ibm all playing a part. they'll discuss ways to work together and try to find a balanced approach to reducing the deficit. during a closed-door meeting yesterday with union leaders and liberal supporters, president obama reportedly vowed that he would, quote, not budge when it comes to letting the bush tax cuts expire for the country's highest earners. labor leader and president of the afl-cio, richard trumka, was among those at the white house meeting. he said he and the president are on the same page. >> we're very, very committed to making sure that the middle class and workers don't end up paying the tab for a party that we didn't get to go to. the president led with that notion of protecting the middle class, and now you have republicans that have it in their power, they could sign a bill tomorrow that protects
seem to be moving closer to a key sticking point. >> speaker boehner seemed to suggest that he was open to closing loopholes, to real tax reform. can you get there by just closing loopholes, or will it take more than that? >> well, look, i don't want to prejudge the discussions. i think that the speaker's comments have been encouraging and there is obviously money to be gained by closing some of these, closing some of these loopholes and applying them to deficit reduction. there are a lot of ways to skin this cat. gregg: illinois congressman peter roskam joins us. he is on the house ways and means committee. he joins us from chicago. good to see you. house speaker boehner says he will oppose any increase in tax rates. and the white house said on friday, and i will read this directly, the president will veto any bill that includes an extension of the current tax rates for those earning more than $250,000 a year. so congressman, where is the come promize? >> i think the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. we've heard this language coming from the white house before. we hea
boehner, basically had a deal in place, it ended up getting blown up at the last minute. i think there is a, perhaps, a new conciliation on both sides. i think they were waiting for the election to get over. i think the attitudes are positive on both sides. and i think they've got the framework for a deal already set up from last year. so i don't think that there are any closer but i also don't think they were that far away last year in 2011. >> do you think that closing the loopholes would be enough for a deficit reduction package? >> it doesn't appear that that's going to raise enough revenue to get to where the democrats want that to be. republicans say they don't want to raise rates. there are some -- there's some budget chicanery that can go on in terms of dealing with one baseline instead of another baseline. that's what it looked like boehner wanted to do last year. there are a lot of different options here. it's interesting, bill kristol from the weekly standard appeared to be talking to grover norquist, the anti-tax activist in those comments that he played earlier, talk
't be enough of those to block passage. speaker boehner will put a coalition together of moderate companies, even some conservative republicans along with democrats to get a deal that has some increased revenue probably in marginal rate increases, also some deduction closing loophole closing, probably corporate tax rates will change tick lei larly on carried interest. he will sell it to enough people through the house while not risk it to those who have races in 2014 who might get a primary. he won't get so many defections he won't get a deal across. we shouldn't jump to the conclusion because there are still hard-line conservatives no-tax increase republicans in the house that they dominate now, they don't dominate. >> ben white, interesting analysis. >>> just heard ben white thinks we're going to get a deal done but right now america's economy is still being held hostage. the fact that washington is on vacation -- not helping. eamon javers is live on capitol hill where congress isn't. eamon. >> that's right. look behind me. see if you see any members of congress. they're not here, they're
'll play their hand i think to their full advantage. >> what kind of hand does john boehner have? where sg it leave him and his ability to control the tea party wing? >> it actually puts skron boehner in a good position because during the debt ceiling talks last year, he had a lot of push back from the very far right of his party in the house. the tea party caucus, for example. this time around we won't see the same dynamic at all because the tea party caucus and far right have lost a lot of political capital in light of the election. so what we've already seen is speaker boehner talking to republicans in the house, putting his foot down early and saying we're not going to have that same push back we saw. instead, i'm going to tell you what we're going to do and what this deal is going to look like and you'll fall into line. >> he got criticism because he negotiated a deal and then went back and tried to sell to the party. does he naed to do he need to d way around, get a set position and then go into discussions? >> i think that is the thinking this time around. and he has certainly recog
of them is obamacare, as john boehner put it the other way, it's the law of the land. that means that businesses are going to be laying people off. that means that over eight million americans who are part time are going to continue to work part time until we see a real resurgence in this economy, certainly. because it's just not economical for the employer to move ahead. it's cheaper for them, in fact, to pay a $2,000 fine. imagine this, to pay $2,000 for an employee they didn't hire who they've hired and not put them on an employee-sponsored insurance plan. this is the exact reversefect of what we had, you know, been told would occur. but we should be used to that, because so much of the -- so many of the consequences have not been intended because they were never thought out by this congress, the previous congress. and we're looking at people saying it's partisanship. let me give you an example of why that's pure bull, shannon, many i fay. shannon: please do. >> one of the companies laying off people is a company called stryker, one of the medical device makers, one of the big
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)